David Oppertshauser
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                                                  In the first chapter of his letter to the Romans Paul mentions the wrath of God in verse eighteen. “For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who hold the truth in unrighteousness; Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them”.  The NLT renders it this way: “But God shows his anger from heaven against all sinful, wicked people who suppress the truth by their wickedness. They know the truth about God because he has made it obvious to them.”                 There seems to be a strong reluctance these days to talk about the wrath of God.  It certainly can’t be due to a lack of unrighteousness or sin in our world. There’s no shortage of that.  No, this reluctance seems to stem the general determination to paint God the Father and in particular God’s son Jesus only as the God of love. And God is love as per the scriptures. (I John 4:8&16). If this truth is considered in isolation the logical conclusion then is that God certainly will not punish anyone, or at least he will punish only the serious criminals and evil doers while the average person will not be affected.                 Perhaps this stems from the thought that we will be able to bring people to Christ by emphasizing God’s love attribute. If so that initiative has largely been a failure. Another common trend in our culture these days is the lack of concern or fear about the possibility of a coming judgement. Is this because no one talks about God’s wrath or coming judgement?                 God is indeed the God of love. Loved us so much that he gave his son to die for us that we would have the opportunity to escape God’s wrath. Yes, he is also a God of wrath. His perfect Holiness demands wrath against sin. God’s wrath is cited by John the Baptist, Jesus, and Paul. And for those who have trouble associating Jesus with wrath, check out Revelation 6:16: “Fall on us, and hide us from the face of him that sitteth on the throne, and from the wrath of the Lamb: (Jesus)  For the great day of his wrath is come; and who shall be able to stand?”  The wrath of God is mentioned several times in Revelation.                 So, balance is the key word here. We need to understand and teach that God is a God of love, but He is also a Holy God whose wrath will always be against sin and unrighteousness. Thankfully our sin can be forgiven through the grace and mercy that came at Calvary but we need to always take sin, unrighteousness and God’s wrath very seriously.                                                                                                                 Pastor Dave…